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Horse Shoe Inn

ADDRESS

Horse Shoe Inn
Hutton Roof
Penrith
Cumbria
CA11 0XS

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Information about words in this venue name

horse

1. a large, solid-hoofed, herbivorous quadruped, Equus caballus, domesticated since prehistoric times, bred in a number of varieties, and used for carrying or pulling loads, for riding, and for racing.
2. a fully mature male animal of this type; stallion.
3. any of several odd-toed ungulates belonging to the family Equidae, including the horse, zebra, donkey, and ass, having a thick, flat coat with a narrow mane along the back of the neck and bearing the weight on only one functioning digit, the third, which is widened into a round or spade-shaped hoof.
4. something on which a person rides, sits, or exercises, as if astride the back of such an animal: rocking horse.
5. Also called trestle. a frame, block, etc., with legs, on which something is mounted or supported.
horse, hoofed, herbivorous mammal now represented by a single extant genus, Equus. The term horse commonly refers only to the domestic Equus caballus and to the wild Przewalski''s horse. Adapted to plains environments, all Equus species, including the ass and the zebra, have lengthened foot bones ending in a single toe covered by a hoof, for fast running; teeth shaped for grinding grass; and intestinal protozoa for digesting cellulose.

shoe

1. an external covering for the human foot, usually of leather and consisting of a more or less stiff or heavy sole and a lighter upper part ending a short distance above, at, or below the ankle.
2. an object or part resembling a shoe in form, position, or use.
3. a horseshoe or a similar plate for the hoof of some other animal.
4. a ferrule or the like, as of iron, for protecting the end of a staff, pole, etc.
5. See brake shoe.
6. the outer casing of a pneumatic automobile tire.
7. a drag or skid for a wheel of a vehicle.
8. a part having a larger area than the end of an object on which it fits, serving to disperse or apply its weight or thrust.
9. the sliding contact by which an electric car or locomotive takes its current from the third rail.
10. Civ. Engin.
a. a member supporting one end of a truss or girder in a bridge.
b. a hard and sharp foot of a pile or caisson for piercing underlying soil.
11. a small molding, as a quarter round, closing the angle between a baseboard and a floor.
12. the outwardly curved portion at the base of a downspout.
13. a piece of iron or stone, sunk into the ground, against which the leaves of a gateway are shut.
14. a device on a camera that permits an accessory, as a flashgun, to be attached.
15. a band of iron on the bottom of the runner of a sleigh.
16. Cards.See dealing box.
1. shoe, footwear, footgear
usage: footwear shaped to fit the foot with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
2. shoe, case
usage: a case from which playing cards are dealt one at a time
3. horseshoe, shoe, plate, scale, shell
usage: U-shaped plate nailed to underside of horse''s hoof
4. brake shoe, shoe, skid, restraint, constraint
usage: a restraint provided when the brake linings are moved hydraulically against the brake drum to retard the wheel''s rotation
shoe, foot covering, usually of leather, consisting of a sole and a portion above the sole called an upper. In prehistoric times skins or hides may have been tied around the foot for protection and warmth; studies of the foot bones of ancient humans suggest that some form of sturdy footwear was worn by human beings beginning between 40,000 and 26,000 years ago. The shoes found with the 5,300-year-old “Ice Man” in the Tyrolean Alps were made of skins and braided-bark netting and stuffed with straw and moss. The sandal, a very early form of the shoe, was worn in Egypt, Greece, and Rome; a more ancient example , woven from plant materials, was found in an Oregon cave. An early form of the boot was also known in Greece and Rome. The characteristic shoe of the Middle Ages was the soft, clinging moccasin, which extended to the ankle. It was highly decorated and was of velvet, cloth of gold, and, increasingly, of leather. By the 13th cent. the toe had become greatly elongated until a century later the point had to be held aloft by a chain attached to the knee. After 1377 wooden clogs, called poulaines or pattens, were introduced. A forerunner of the heeled shoe, they were fastened under the shoe to protect it from mud or water.

inn

1. a commercial establishment that provides lodging, food, etc., for the public, esp. travelers; small hotel.
2. a tavern.
3. Brit.
a. any of several buildings in London formerly used as places of residence for students, esp. law students. Cf. Inns of Court.
b. a legal society occupying such a building.
Inn
a river in central Europe, flowing from S Switzerland through Austria and Germany into the Danube. 320 mi. long.
1. hostel, hostelry, inn, lodge, hotel
usage: a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
Inns are generally establishments or buildings where travellers can seek lodging and, usually, food and drink. They are typically located in the country or along a highway. Found in Europe, they possibly first sprang up when the Romans built their system of Roman roads two millennia ago. Some inns in Europe are several centuries old. In addition to providing for the needs of travellers, inns traditionally acted as community gathering places.

In Europe, it is the provision of accommodation, if anything, that now separates inns from taverns, alehouses and pubs. The latter tend to supply alcohol , but less commonly accommodation. Inns tend to be grander and more long-lived establishments; historically they provided not only food and lodging, but also stabling and fodder for the traveller''s horse and fresh horses for the mail coach. Famous London examples of inns include the George and The Tabard. There is however no longer a formal distinction between an inn and other kinds of establishment. Many pubs use the name "inn", either because they are long established and may have been formerly coaching inns, or to summon up a particular kind of image.

 

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