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The Boat Inn

ADDRESS

The Boat Inn
RUGBY RD
STOCKTON
SOUTHAM
CV23 8HQ

TELEPHONE NUMBERS:
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Information about words in this venue name

boat

1. a vessel for transport by water, constructed to provide buoyancy by excluding water and shaped to give stability and permit propulsion.
2. a small ship, generally for specialized use: a fishing boat.
3. a small vessel carried for use by a large one, as a lifeboat: They lowered the boats for evacuation.
4. a ship.
5. a vessel of any size built for navigation on a river or other inland body of water.
6. a serving dish resembling a boat: a gravy boat; a celery boat.
7. Eccles.a container for holding incense before it is placed in the censer.
8. in the same boat, in the same circumstances; faced with the same problems: The new recruits were all in the same boat.
9. miss the boat, Informal.
a. to fail to take advantage of an opportunity: He missed the boat when he applied too late to get into college.
1. boat, vessel, watercraft
usage: a small vessel for travel on water
2. gravy boat, gravy holder, sauceboat, boat, dish
usage: a dish (often boat-shaped) for serving gravy or sauce
boat, small, open nautical vessel propelled by sail, oar, pole, paddle, or motor. The use of the term boat for larger vessels, although common, is somewhat improper, but the line between boats and ships is not easy to draw. A number of special types of boat are generally referred to by their individual names rather than by the generic term, e.g., the canoe, the kayak (Eskimo decked canoe), and the umiak (Eskimo open boat). Simple dugouts, made from hollowed-out logs, have been known since prehistoric times to all peoples dwelling on waterways. The ancient Egyptians used boats made of acacia wood and held together with pegs. Modern wooden boats are built in four ways: with fore-and-aft planks laid with their edges flush (carvel-built); with fore-and-aft planks laid with overlapping edges (clinker-built); with inner and outer layers of planks running diagonally in opposite directions; and with planking consisting of large sheets of plywood. Many boats, however, are now made of molded fiberglass or of aluminum. Primitive boats in many parts of the world are stabilized by an outrigger—a parallel float attached by projecting arms.

inn

1. a commercial establishment that provides lodging, food, etc., for the public, esp. travelers; small hotel.
2. a tavern.
3. Brit.
a. any of several buildings in London formerly used as places of residence for students, esp. law students. Cf. Inns of Court.
b. a legal society occupying such a building.
Inn
a river in central Europe, flowing from S Switzerland through Austria and Germany into the Danube. 320 mi. long.
1. hostel, hostelry, inn, lodge, hotel
usage: a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
Inns are generally establishments or buildings where travellers can seek lodging and, usually, food and drink. They are typically located in the country or along a highway. Found in Europe, they possibly first sprang up when the Romans built their system of Roman roads two millennia ago. Some inns in Europe are several centuries old. In addition to providing for the needs of travellers, inns traditionally acted as community gathering places.

In Europe, it is the provision of accommodation, if anything, that now separates inns from taverns, alehouses and pubs. The latter tend to supply alcohol , but less commonly accommodation. Inns tend to be grander and more long-lived establishments; historically they provided not only food and lodging, but also stabling and fodder for the traveller''s horse and fresh horses for the mail coach. Famous London examples of inns include the George and The Tabard. There is however no longer a formal distinction between an inn and other kinds of establishment. Many pubs use the name "inn", either because they are long established and may have been formerly coaching inns, or to summon up a particular kind of image.

 

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