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White Lion Inn

ADDRESS

White Lion Inn
Llynclys
Oswestry
Shropshire
SY10 8LJ


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Information about words in this venue name

white

An English surname.
1. of the color of pure snow, of the margins of this page, etc.; reflecting nearly all the rays of sunlight or a similar light.
2. light or comparatively light in color.
3. marked by slight pigmentation of the skin, as of many Caucasoids.
4. for, limited to, or predominantly made up of persons whose racial heritage is Caucasian: a white club; a white neighborhood.
5. pallid or pale, as from fear or other strong emotion: white with rage.
6. silvery, gray, or hoary: white hair.
7. snowy: a white Christmas.
8. lacking color; transparent.
Recorded as White, Wight, Whyte, and the unusual Whight, this is an English surname of the most ancient origins. It has a number of possible origins. In the single spellings of White or Wita, it appears in the very earliest surviving registers such as the famous Anglo-Saxon Chronicles of the pre 9th century a.d. Whilst translating as white, the early name referred either to a baby, one who was "unblemished", or it may have been for some nameholders an ethnic term given to a Viking or Anglo-Saxon, who were pale in hair and complexion compared with the original native Celts, who were dark. Another possible origin is residential. If so this could describe somebody who lived at a "wiht", generally regarded as being the bend of a river, but in some areas of the country could describe a stretch of land suitable for grazing. It could also mean "The wait", as in the village name of White in Devon, which originally, it is claimed, denoted a place suitable for an ambush! Lastly the name can be Huguenot 17th century. Many French people called ''Blanc'' fled France after 1685, and in England they changed their name to White. Early examples of the surname recording taken from surving charters and egisters include: Ordgar se Wite of Somerset in the year 1070, Walter le Wytte in London in 1284, and William le Wytt, in the Subsidy Rolls of York in 1327.

lion

1. lion, king of beasts, Panthera leo, big cat, cat
usage: large gregarious predatory feline of Africa and India having a tawny coat with a shaggy mane in the male
2. lion, social lion, celebrity, famous person
usage: a celebrity who is lionized
3. Leo, Lion, person, individual, someone, somebody, mortal, human, soul
usage: a person who is born while the sun is in Leo
4. Leo, Leo the Lion, Lion, sign of the zodiac, star sign, sign, mansion, house, planetary house
usage: the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22
1. a large, usually tawny-yellow cat, Panthera leo, native to Africa and southern Asia, having a tufted tail and, in the male, a large mane.
2. any of various related large wildcats, as the cougar.
3. a man of great strength, courage, etc.
4. a person of great importance, influence, charm, etc., who is much admired as a celebrity: a literary lion.
5. the lion as the national emblem of Great Britain.
6. Astron., Astrol.the constellation or sign of Leo.
7. a member of any one of the internationally affiliated service clubs founded in 1917 and dedicated to promoting responsible citizenship, sound government, and community, national, and international welfare.
8. Numis.
a. a silver, Anglo-Gallic denier, issued during the reign of Henry III, bearing the figure of a lion.
b. a gold coin of Scotland, issued c14001589, bearing the figure of a lion.
c. any of various other coins bearing the figure of a lion.
d. hardhead2.
9. Brit.an object of interest or note.
10. beard the lion in its den, to confront or attack someone, esp. a powerful or feared person, in that person''s own familiar surroundings.
11. twist the lion''s tail, to tax the patience of or provoke a person, group, nation, or government, esp. that of Great Britain.

inn

1. a commercial establishment that provides lodging, food, etc., for the public, esp. travelers; small hotel.
2. a tavern.
3. Brit.
a. any of several buildings in London formerly used as places of residence for students, esp. law students. Cf. Inns of Court.
b. a legal society occupying such a building.
Inn
a river in central Europe, flowing from S Switzerland through Austria and Germany into the Danube. 320 mi. long.
1. hostel, hostelry, inn, lodge, hotel
usage: a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
Inns are generally establishments or buildings where travellers can seek lodging and, usually, food and drink. They are typically located in the country or along a highway. Found in Europe, they possibly first sprang up when the Romans built their system of Roman roads two millennia ago. Some inns in Europe are several centuries old. In addition to providing for the needs of travellers, inns traditionally acted as community gathering places.

In Europe, it is the provision of accommodation, if anything, that now separates inns from taverns, alehouses and pubs. The latter tend to supply alcohol , but less commonly accommodation. Inns tend to be grander and more long-lived establishments; historically they provided not only food and lodging, but also stabling and fodder for the traveller''s horse and fresh horses for the mail coach. Famous London examples of inns include the George and The Tabard. There is however no longer a formal distinction between an inn and other kinds of establishment. Many pubs use the name "inn", either because they are long established and may have been formerly coaching inns, or to summon up a particular kind of image.

 

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