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Duke William Inn

ADDRESS

Duke William Inn
Well St
Ainsworth
Bolton
BL2 5SQ

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    Information about words in this venue name

    duke

    1. (in Continental Europe) the male ruler of a duchy; the sovereign of a small state.
    2. a British nobleman holding the highest hereditary title outside the royal family, ranking immediately below a prince and above a marquis; a member of the highest rank of the British peerage. Cf. royal duke.
    3. a nobleman of corresponding rank in certain other countries.
    4. a cultivated hybrid of the sweet and sour cherry.
    5. dukes, Slang.fists; hands: Put up your dukes.
    1. Slang.to hit or thrash with the fists (sometimes fol. by out): He duked me because he said I had insulted him. The bully said he was going to duke out anyone who disagreed.
    2. duke it out, to fight, esp. with the fists; do battle: The adversaries were prepared to duke it out in the alley.
    1. duke, peer
    usage: a British peer of the highest rank
    2. duke, Lord, noble, nobleman
    usage: a nobleman (in various countries) of high rank
    duke is a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch, and historically controlling a duchy. The title comes from the Latin Dux, ''leader'', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province.

    In the Middle Ages the title signified first among the Germanic monarchies. Dukes were the rulers of the provinces and the superiors of the counts in the cities and later, in the feudal monarchies, the highest-ranking peers of the king.

    During the 19th century many of the smaller German and Italian states were ruled by Dukes or Grand Dukes. At present however, with the exception of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, there are no dukes who rule. Duke remains the highest titular peerage in France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom. The Pope, as a temporal sovereign, has also but rarely granted the title of Duke and Duchess to persons for services to the Holy See.

    A woman who holds in her own right the title to such duchy or dukedom, or is the wife of a duke, is normally styled duchess. However, Queen Elizabeth II is known as Duke of Normandy in the Channel Islands and Duke of Lancaster in Lancashire.

    william

    1. a word formerly used in communications to represent the letter W.
    2. a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “will” and “helmet.”
    Recorded in over two hundred spellings and found throughout Europe, this is a surname of Germanic origins. These spellings include: Wilhelm Wilham, Wilharm , William, Williams, Welliam, Gilliam, Gwilliam , Guilaume, Willaume, Willeme , Guillermo, Guillen , Vielmi, Vigietti, Biglietti, Lemmo , and many others. It was introduced into England and Scotland around the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and was carried by four English kings. The derivation is from the pre 7th century personal name "Wilhelm" composed of the elements "wil", meaning "of strong mind", and "helm", translating literally as helmet, but in this context meaning "protection". As a patronymic the short form of "s", meaning "son of", is often added. Political correctness is not a new phenomena, and after the accession of King William 1st in 1066, the name became the most popular British personal name, and with the creation of surnames from the 12th century, an equally popular surname. The list of prominent holders of the surname is almost endless, but one of the more unusual could be said to be the famous republican Oliver Cromwell, who "reigned" in England from 1650 to 1658, and whose family were formerly called Williams. They held extensive estates in Wales, but under instructions from King Henry V111 , the family name was changed to Cromwell. The first recorded spelling of the family name anywhere in the world is believed to be that of Richard William. This was dated 1279, in the "Hundred Rolls" of the county of Oxfordshire, England

    inn

    1. a commercial establishment that provides lodging, food, etc., for the public, esp. travelers; small hotel.
    2. a tavern.
    3. Brit.
    a. any of several buildings in London formerly used as places of residence for students, esp. law students. Cf. Inns of Court.
    b. a legal society occupying such a building.
    Inn
    a river in central Europe, flowing from S Switzerland through Austria and Germany into the Danube. 320 mi. long.
    1. hostel, hostelry, inn, lodge, hotel
    usage: a hotel providing overnight lodging for travelers
    Inns are generally establishments or buildings where travellers can seek lodging and, usually, food and drink. They are typically located in the country or along a highway. Found in Europe, they possibly first sprang up when the Romans built their system of Roman roads two millennia ago. Some inns in Europe are several centuries old. In addition to providing for the needs of travellers, inns traditionally acted as community gathering places.

    In Europe, it is the provision of accommodation, if anything, that now separates inns from taverns, alehouses and pubs. The latter tend to supply alcohol , but less commonly accommodation. Inns tend to be grander and more long-lived establishments; historically they provided not only food and lodging, but also stabling and fodder for the traveller''s horse and fresh horses for the mail coach. Famous London examples of inns include the George and The Tabard. There is however no longer a formal distinction between an inn and other kinds of establishment. Many pubs use the name "inn", either because they are long established and may have been formerly coaching inns, or to summon up a particular kind of image.

     

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