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Lord Hill

ADDRESS

Lord Hill
High St
Dawley
Telford
TF4 2EX


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Information about words in this venue name

lord

1. Godhead, Lord, Creator, Maker, Divine, God Almighty, Almighty, Jehovah, God, Supreme Being
usage: terms referring to the Judeo-Christian God
2. overlord, master, lord, ruler, swayer
usage: a person who has general authority over others
3. Lord, noble, nobleman, male aristocrat
usage: a titled peer of the realm
1. lord, ennoble, gentle, entitle
usage: make a lord of someone
1. a person who has authority, control, or power over others; a master, chief, or ruler.
2. a person who exercises authority from property rights; an owner of land, houses, etc.
3. a person who is a leader or has great influence in a chosen profession: the great lords of banking.
4. a feudal superior; the proprietor of a manor.
5. a titled nobleman or peer; a person whose ordinary appellation contains by courtesy the title Lord or some higher title.
6. Lords,the Lords Spiritual and Lords Temporal comprising the House of Lords.
7. (cap.) (in Britain)
a. the title of certain high officials (used with some other title, name, or the like): Lord Mayor of London.
b. the formally polite title of a bishop: Lord Bishop of Durham.
c. the title informally substituted for marquis, earl, viscount, etc., as in the use of Lord Kitchener for Earl Kitchener.
8. (cap.) the Supreme Being; God; Jehovah.
9. (cap.) the Savior, Jesus Christ.
10. Astrol.a planet having dominating influence.
(often cap.) (used in exclamatory phrases to express surprise, elation, etc.): Lord, what a beautiful day!
lord it, to assume airs of importance and authority; behave arrogantly or dictatorially; domineer: to lord it over the menial workers.

hill

A surname.

Submit Coat of Arms Hill Meaning: dweller at or near a hill that lay on rising ground; one who came from Hill, the name of several places in England.

1. a natural elevation of the earth''''''''s surface, smaller than a mountain.
2. an incline, esp. in a road: This old jalopy won''''''''t make it up the next hill.
3. an artificial heap, pile, or mound: a hill made by ants.
4. a small mound of earth raised about a cultivated plant or a cluster of such plants.
5. the plant or plants so surrounded: a hill of potatoes.
6. Baseball.mound1 .
7. go over the hill, Slang.
a. to break out of prison.
b. to absent oneself without leave from one''''''''s military unit.
c. to leave suddenly or mysteriously: Rumor has it that her husband has gone over the hill.
8. over the hill,
a. relatively advanced in age.
b. past one''''''''s prime.
9. the Hill.See Capitol Hill.
This distinguished surname, with over fifty entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and having no less than seventy-five Coats of Arms, is of Olde English pre 7th century derivation. It has two completely distinct possible origins. The first and most obvious being a topographical name from residence by or on a hill. The derivation is from the word "hyll", and requires no further explanation. These topographical surnames, which in their early forms were accompanied by a preposition such as ''''ate'''' or ''''del'''', were mong the earliest created, as natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. Early examples of the name from this source include William Attehil of Cambridge in the 1260 Subsidy Rolls and Thomas del Hill of Yorkshire in the 1379 Poll Tax rolls. However recent research indicates that many name holders may derive from the medieval personal and baptismal name "Hille". This is a semi nickname or short form of one of the many Anglo-Saxon compound names with the first element "hild", meaning battle or war, such as Hildebrand and Hilliard or the French ''''hilaire'''' from the Latin ''''hilaris'''' meaning ''''cheerful''''. These are all surnames and personal names in their own right. One of the ''''first'''' of all Americans was Elizabeth Hill, recorded as born in ''''Elizabeth Cittie, Virginia'''' before 1620. The earliest coat of arms is that of Sir Robert Hill in the time of King Henry V1 in 1430 was silver, a black chevron between three water bouchets.

 

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